Danny with his crew casting lava directly from a flow on Volcano Pacaya, Guatemala. 2010.

Danny with his crew casting lava directly from a flow on Volcano Pacaya, Guatemala. 2010.

Danny’s interest in lava started over thirty years ago after spending six months painting volcanoes in the Andes of Northern Chile which has one of the largest concentration of volcanoes in the world. More recently, he has been going to erupting volcanoes in Hawaii and Guatemala to catch molten lava flowing from volcanic vents to create sculpture - the first person to do this. He feels this is a deeply symbolic artistic gesture which permeated each piece of work brought home. The whole surface of the earth was covered with lava four billion years ago. It slowly cooled over many millions of years and metamorphosed into all the minerals, rocks, water and lifeforms, including us. Danny says, “When I form a sculpture of a conquistadores helmet or a baby bottle from molten lava, it takes a mighty great leap in time, from the creation of the earth to the brutality of the conquistadors or the nurturing of a baby’s bottle of milk.”

Gerry assisting Danny with casting lava on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, 2012.

Gerry assisting Danny with casting lava on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, 2012.

Danny opening stomach mould. Hawaii 2012.

Danny opening stomach mould. Hawaii 2012.

Danny opening ammo box mould, Hawaii 2012.

Danny opening ammo box mould, Hawaii 2012.

Bowler Hat, cast lava, 16 x 28 x 34cms. 2015.

Bowler Hat, cast lava, 16 x 28 x 34cms. 2015.

Three pith helmets, cast lava, each 22.5 x 25 x 30cms. 2015

Three pith helmets, cast lava, each 22.5 x 25 x 30cms. 2015

Babies bottles and spare teats, cast lava. each 19 x 5.5 x 5.5cms. 2015.

Babies bottles and spare teats, cast lava. each 19 x 5.5 x 5.5cms. 2015.

Sculpture installation at Landmarks & Lifeforms exhibition, High Lanes Gallery, Drogheda, 2018

Bible .jpg

Bible, cast lava, 22 x 15 x 6cms. 2017.

Mitt forming hot lava, 2017.

Mitt forming hot lava, 2017.